Location Funding Institution Principal Investigator(s)
Hawaii $79,600 University of Hawaii at Manoa, University of Guam, and University of Queensland Y.C. Shang, P.S. Leung, C. Tisdell, and J. Brown

Test market giant clam in half-shell in Honolulu and Guam and as an aquarium species on the U.S. mainland and in Australia.

Location Funding Institution Principal Investigator(s)
Hawaii $30,000 University of Hawaii at Manoa, University of Guam, and University of Queensland Y.C. Shang, P.S. Leung, J. Brown, and C. Tisdell

The objective of this project is to evaluate the economic feasibility of producing different giant clam products. The evaluation consists of three parts:

  • collection of production cost data;
  • economic evaluation of different giant clam products; and
  • a comparative economic study.

 

Location Funding Institution Principal Investigator(s)
Hawaii $53,200

University of Hawaii at Manoa, University of Guam, and University of Queensland

Y.C. Shang, P.S. Leung, P. Callaghan, J. Brown, and C. Tisdell

  1. Characterize the existing markets for major giant clam products in four key countries: U.S., Japan, Taiwan, and Australia.
  2. Test market giant clam on half-shell and as an aquarium species in selected markets.

 

Location Funding Institution Principal Investigator(s)
Hawaii $50,000 University of Hawai’i at Mānoa and HDOA Jenee Odani, Ph.D. and Lei Yamasaki, Ph.D.

Overall Goal
To create a USDA-approved laboratory within one year to conduct testing for the seven current OIE-listed diseases (WSV, IHHNV, TSV, YHV, IMNV, NHP, and AHPND) and the eight additional diseases required for exporting live shrimp (MBV, HPV, MoV, EHP, LSNV, CMNV, BP and PvNV).

Objectives
1. Hire and train a PCR technician within three months.
2. Develop and implement a Quality Management system for the laboratory’s activities within six months (required for USDA-approval).
3. Attain proficiency at performing PCR tests for the seven current OIE-listed shrimp pathogens and 8 other pathogens required to meet export demands within one year.
4. Provide fee-based services to Hawaii shrimp broodstock producers and achieve financial self-sufficiency within 18-months.

Location Funding Institution Principal Investigator(s)
Hawaii $68,024 University of Hawaii at Manoa Kent Kobayashi, Ph.D., Harry Ako, Ph.D.
    Year 1
  1. Test the efficacy of the air breathers’ Chinese catfish Clarias fuscus and Asian snakehead Channa sp. for aquaponics in Hawaii. Use of air breathers could obviate the need for aeration and further simplify our aquaponics system. A downside of low dissolved oxygen could be enhanced denitrification. The issue of denitrification will also be addressed for Pacific Island systems using tilapia.
  2. Determine the nutrient profile of fish water generated by metabolism of a locally produced feed and determine the need for supplementation of this feed.
  3. Develop a planting and harvest scheme that will allow constant marketing of product. Complete a manual describing the construction, start up, and operation of the new aquaponics system.
  4. Take materials to a client in the Pacific and build a system. Train farmers and local extension staff to build and operate the system. Demonstrate the operation of the system onsite and work with the farmers to make sales arrangements with a local customer.
  5. Year 2
  6. Conduct research in Hawaii that will refine the system for the Pacific Island client and/or expand the system to produce other desirable hydroponics vegetables.
  7. Make a site visit to extend this technology, and possibly assist other farmers to establish an aquaponics system.
  8. Work with any interested fish farms in Hawaii to integrate hydroponics into their current production scheme, or agriculture farms interested in expanding into fish or reducing fertilizer costs..

 

Location Funding Institution Principal Investigator(s)
Hawaii $63,546

University of Hawaii at Hilo, University of Hawaii at Manoa, and Ponape Agriculture and Trade School

M. Haws, T. Lewis, S. Ellis

The overall goal of this project is to conduct applied research to address some previously identified, critical bottlenecks to black-lip pearl oyster hatchery and nursery techniques in Micronesia.

Component 1: Hatchery and Nursery Methods

  1. Develop simple, cost-effective, land-based early nursery techniques for black-lip pearl oysters and perform a cost-benefit analysis of these techniques compared with established ocean-based culture techniques.
  2. Determine natural spawning seasons for black-lip pearl oysters in Pohnpei, FSM and share data with a similar effort to be conducted at Majuro, RMI so that hatchery operators may better time their activities thus increasing the cost effectiveness of these operations. The same information will also assist in scheduling and preparing for grafting operations.

Component 2: Pearl Oyster Population Genetics

  1. Collect samples from hatcheries in Hawaii, FSM, and RMI as well as from natural stocks to provide genomic DNA for population genetics analysis.
  2. Perform amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis for genetic fingerprint.
  3. Screen microsatellite library to identify diagnostic loci for genetic fingerprint.
Progress Report
Location Funding Institution Principal Investigator(s)
Hawaii $100,000

Oceanic Institute

C. Laidley

The goal of this project is to increase the density and efficiency of greater amberjack fingerling production to meet demands for growout operations (offshore and on-shore) in the State of Hawaii. In addition to being reliable, these systems must be economically viable and environmentally responsible.

  1. Determine the maximal stocking density for nursery production systems under advanced partial water reuse system technologies.
  2. Disseminate project findings through on-site working sessions and via a full written nursery protocol for industry dissemination.

 

Progress Report
Location Funding Institution Principal Investigator(s)
Hawaii $100,000

Oceanic Institute

C. Laidley

  1. Increase supply of high-quality amberjack eggs throughout the year to levels sufficient to stock a minimum of one hatchery run (~2 million larvae) in a day or two each month.
  2. Develop methods to prevent or control monogean infestation of amberjack.
  3. Conduct workshop, produce scientific paper(s), and develop fact sheet incorporating results of this project for rapid transfer to farmers in Hawaii and the Pacific region.

 

Location Funding Institution Principal Investigator(s)
Hawaii $100,000 Oceanic Institute C. Laidley
  1. Determine the effects of larval diet and pre-harvest sieving on reducing size variability and increasing survival of post-metamorphosed amberjack.
  2. Develop techniques to maximize survival of juvenile amberjack for air-transport over long distances (up to 8 hours) and ocean transport to offshore cages.
  3. Obtain preliminary biological performance information of amberjack during offshore nursery and growout phases.
  4. Conduct workshop and develop factsheet incorporating results of this project for rapid transfer to farmers in Hawaii and the Pacific region.

 

Final Report
Location Funding Institution Principal Investigator(s)
Hawaii $34,855 University of Hawaii Sea Grant Extension Service B. Miller, H. Takata, and P. Olin
  1. The production of a regional catalogue and directory for aquaculture supplies, services, and information is intended to meet the following objectives:
  2. Enhance communications between producers, buyers, information specialists, and other professionals in the aquaculture industry within the widely diverse and isolated states of the USDA Center for Tropical and Subtropical geographic region.
  3. Meet practical information requirements of a start-up and working aquaculturists in a consolidated, consistent, and useful format consistent with the time demands on most farmers.
  4. Serve regional development planners as a supply side/commercial infrastructure assessment of each island state.
  5. Serve growth of private industry as an educational catalogue in itself, and stimulate production ideas, business opportunities, and creative entrepreneurship.
  6. Serve as a tool for extension personnel to more efficiently serve their operating private sector clients, saving the time and effort currently involved in providing routine information to entry level questions.

 

Location Funding Institution Principal Investigator(s)
Hawaii $10,859 University of Hawaii at Hilo M. Shintaku
Location Funding Institution Principal Investigator(s)
American Samoa $36,450 Oceanic Institute Warren G. Dominy, Ph.D.
  1. Identify, quantify and collect potential local products and byproducts for aquatic feeds development in American Samoa and dry samples for shipment to the Oceanic Institute (OI)for compositional analysis.
  2. Analyze the nutrient composition of selected samples.
  3. Compile a feed manual containing analyzed nutrition composition data for locally available ingredients and byproducts; formulated diets for Tilapia using the local ingredients; established feed processing methods and quality control tests and obtained their availability, quantity and price.
  4. Transfer of technology and dissemination of information will be achieved through a workshop and feed manual hand-outs to local producers and farmers.

 

Location Funding Institution Principal Investigator(s)
Hawaii $180,000 Oceanic Institute, University of Hawaii Sea Grant Extension Service, and University of Hawaii at Manoa G.D. Pruder, D.A. Ziemann, B. Miller, and J.K. Wang

Project I: Characterization of Aquaculture Effluent, Environmental Impact Assessment for Effluent from Hawaiian Aquaculture Facilities

  1. Compile and review the pertinent federal, state, and local regulations applicable to aquaculture discharges.
  2. Categorize discharges based on the organisms being cultured and the culture system design.
  3. Compile existing data for representative culture systems and acquire new data as required.
  4. Characterize the quality of effluents discharged from typical Hawaiian aquaculture facilities in terms of chemical species, concentrations, and mass loadings.
  5. Perform a case study for an actual aquaculture facility.
  6. Categorize potential receiving waters for aquaculture discharges on the basis of their physical, chemical, and biological characteristics.
  7. Project the quality and quantity of discharge effluents from a range of typical aquaculture facilities.
  8. Assess the potential for environmental impact, whether positive, negative, or negligible, of the aquaculture effluents discharged into a variety of receiving waters in order to determine the combinations of facility design and discharge locations which present the optimal impact scenarios.


Project II: Effluent Treatment Processes

The overall goal of this component is to produce a state-of-the-art detailed baseline reference document “Engineering Opportunities and Constraints in the Treatment of Aquaculture Effluent.” General long-term objectives are to provide cost-effective aquaculture effluent discharge treatment technology as necessary to satisfy discharge limit regulations, and to obtain required operating permits. It is understood that the treatment process will vary with effluent characteristics and site discharge assimilation capacity as evidenced by environmental impact.

Project III: Education and Regulation Modification

This component has the singular objective of fostering a dialogue between aquaculturists, public regulators, and policy makers leading toward increased understanding and consideration of environmental regulations governing aquaculture effluent discharges into the environment. This proposal is targeted for one year, with proposed subsequent action for a second year.

Location Funding Institution Principal Investigator(s)
Hawaii $48,000.00 Oceanic Institute, University of Hawaii Sea Grant Extension Service, and University of Hawaii at Manoa G.D. Pruder, D.A. Ziemann, B. Miller, and J.K. Wang

Project I. Characterization of Aquaculture Effluent and Environmental Impact Assessment for Effluent from Hawaiian Aquaculture Ponds

  1. Assist and participate in the ADP/SG workshop scheduled for September 1989.
  2. Provide feedback to Project II concerning the potential environmental impact of aquaculture effluent as modified through control of inputs and operational methodologies or through conventional or non-conventional treatments.
  3. Prepare revisions of the project final report as appropriate for inclusion as a chapter in the reference book being prepared in Project II.

Project II: Effluent Treatment Process

Identify, characterize, quantify, and exploit opportunities inherent in aquacultural systems to improve effluent quality through control and manipulation of inputs and operational methodology

Project III: Education and Regulation Modification

This project has the singular objective of fostering a dialogue between aquaculturists, public regulators, and policy makers leading toward increased understanding and consideration of environmental regulations governing aquaculture effluent discharges into receiving waters.

Location Funding Institution Principal Investigator(s)
Hawaii $127,000 Oceanic Institute G.D. Pruder and D.A. Ziemann

Project I: Zones of Mixing: Technical Review and Cost Analysis

Establish a set of uniform requirements for the establishment of Zones of Mixing and monitoring programs for aquaculture effluent discharges.

Project II: Aquaculture Alternatives to Coastal Water Discharge: Technical Review and Cost Analysis

Identify the technical potential and projected cost of various approaches to eliminate the discharge of aquaculture effluent into public coastal waters.

Project III: Commercial Aquaculture Zones and Environmental Impact Assessment and Monitoring

  1. Expedite revision of Hawaii State effluent discharge regulations as applied to aquaculture facilities, in order to foster expansion of aquaculture while protecting coastal water quality.
  2. Establish the value of and necessity for publicly funded environmental monitoring and impact assessment.

 

Location Funding Institution Principal Investigator(s)
Hawaii $64,100 Oceanic Institute G.D. Pruder and D.A. Ziemann

Project I: Aquaculture Recycled Seawater: Characterization and Utilization

  1. Complete the characterization of the aquaculture recycled seawater quality, and describe the results in publications for technical and non-technical readers.
  2. Examine the potential of aquaculture recycled seawater as a nutrient source for environmental enhancement.

Project II: Effects of Aquaculture Effluent on Environmental Quality and Associated Recreational Activities

  1. Organize a cooperative effort involving other regional aquaculture centers.
  2. Document the effects of aquaculture effluent on environmental quality and associated recreational activities. This documentation will be presented in support of efforts to develop responsible and sophisticated effluent discharge regulations.

Collect, analyze, and report information essential to developing responsible and sophisticated aquacultural effluent discharge regulations.

Location Funding Institution Principal Investigator(s)
Hawaii $65,000 Oceanic Institute G.D. Pruder and D.A. Ziemann

Project I: Develop an Effective Approach to State Legislators, and Develop and Provide Model Public Aquaculture Permitting and Regulatory Policies

Establish contact with legislators, and enlist interest and participation in the project; develop a work plan, deliver to state legislators the comprehensive report and analysis prepared in Project 2, below, and produce and deliver to state legislators an analysis of regulatory alternatives for Hawaii and model public policies on governmental permitting and regulatory requirements affecting Hawaii aquaculture operations.

Project II: Document and Analyze Existing Information Regarding Aquaculture Effluent Discharge in Hawaii that Reflects Public Interest in the Environment and Aquaculture

  1. Conduct a preliminary review and analysis of historical Hawaiian practices for inclusion in the comprehensive report.
  2. Compile and edit existing information on aquaculture effluent discharge in Hawaii for inclusion in the comprehensive report.
  3. Analyze information and complete a comprehensive document reflecting public interest in developing the aquaculture industry in Hawaii.

Project III: Quantitative Documentation of Enhanced Grow-out of Desirable Animal Species

Carry out experiment on the grow-out of various animal species, and report analysis of results.

Location Funding Institution Principal Investigator(s)
Hawaii $35,000 Oceanic Institute G.D. Pruder

The overall objective of the project is to reduce the uncertainty, time, and cost of obtaining aquaculture effluent discharge permits and the cost of satisfying aquaculture effluent discharge regulations. Specific objectives related to that goal are to:

  1. Document the effect of aquaculture effluent on water quality and associated recreational activities in Hawaii.
  2.      
  3. Document aquaculture effluent’s growth enhancement effect on desirable aquatic species.

The specific objective for Year 6 is to prepare and publish a report summarizing the findings from the first five years of the project, and recommend regulatory action to the Hawaii State Department of Health.

Location Funding Institution Principal Investigator(s)
Federated States of Micronesia $92,156 College of the Marshall Islands R. Dybdahl and M. Nair R
  1. Refine spawning and hatchery techniques and provide a regular supply of black-lip pearl oyster spat to satisfy industry needs.
  2. Improve spat survival and growth during the nursery phase.
  3. Collect data on spat growth and survival to update and incorporate into an already funded cost production model for hatchery propagation and growout of black-lip pearl oyster spat.
  4. Transfer technology by publishing a site-specific black-lip pearl hatchery manual and by providing extension training and support for black-lip pearl oyster culture. Conduct workshops in the RMI and other U.S.-affiliated Pacific islands such as Guam, American Samoa, and the FSM.
  5. Extension training and support for other commercially important aquaculture species.

 

Final Report
Location Funding Institution Principal Investigator(s)
Republic of the Marshall Islands $82,870 College of Micronesia C. Crawford
  1. Provide aquaculture extension support to private operators and local fishery/aquaculture staff to develop commercial and subsistence aquaculture crops within the Federated States of Micronesia (FSM), the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI), Palau, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI), and American Samoa.
  2. Concentrate on establishing giant clam aquaculture in each region by providing extension support and training for the operation and management of giant clam hatcheries and grow-out farms. Establish a successfully operating giant clam hatchery and farm on Kosrae, which will provide an additional source of seedstock and a demonstration facility for training Micronesians.
  3. Investigate the requirements and practicalities of developing the aquaculture of other species.

 

Location Funding Institution Principal Investigator(s)
Federated States of Micronesia $73,600 College of Micronesia C. Crawford and S. Lindsay

Provide aquaculture extension and training support to private operators and to local fishery/aquaculture staff to develop commercial and subsistence aquaculture crops within the U.S.-affiliated Pacific islands.

  1. Concentrate on establishing giant clam farming.
  2. Assist with the development of the aquaculture of other species.

 

Location Funding Institution Principal Investigator(s)
Federated States of Micronesia $70,000 College of Micronesia S. Lindsay

Provide aquaculture extension and training support to private operators and to local fishery/aquaculture staff to develop commercial and subsistence aquaculture crops within the U.S.-affiliated Pacific islands.

  1. Concentrate on establishing giant clam farming.
  2. Assist with the development of the aquaculture of other species.

 

Location Funding Institution Principal Investigator(s)
Federated States of Micronesia $75,000 College of Micronesia S. Lindsay
  1. Provide aquaculture extension and training support to private operators and to local government fishery and aquaculture staff to develop commercial and subsistence aquaculture crops within the U.S.-affiliated Pacific islands.
  2. Assist in the development of giant clam culture. This will include both giant clam hatcheries and ocean-nursery grow-out farms within the region. These hatcheries include Belau, Pohnpei, Kosrae, Marshall Islands, and American Samoa. Each island identity within this region is involved with ocean-nursery grow-out farms for giant clams. Assistance will be given to each and all upon a request basis.
  3. Help develop and support hatcheries and grow-out farms of aquatic species of plants and animals other than giant clams. These include the culture of sponges, pearl oysters, trochus, and green snails.
  4. Conduct training courses in culture techniques for giant clams and other relevant aquaculture species, general biology of these organisms, and on other topics as requested.
  5. Assist in reef reseeding programs and surveys for giant clams, sponges, and other species requested by local authorities.
  6. Continue to act as the scientific and aquaculture advisor to the National Aquaculture Center (NAC), Kosrae.
  7. Ddevelop methods and techniques of drying and smoking giant clam meat, and initiate these end products into local domestic markets.
  8. Assist in the development of giant clam for sale, both for domestic and international markets for each of the islands entities in the region.

 

Location Funding Institution Principal Investigator(s)
Federated States of Micronesia $98,000 College of Micronesia S. Lindsay
  1. Provide aquaculture extension and training support to private operators and to local government fishery and aquaculture staff to develop commercial and subsistence aquaculture crops within the U.S.-affiliated Pacific Islands.
  2. Assist in the development of giant clam culture. This will include site visits to both giant clam hatcheries and ocean-nursery growout farms within the region.
  3. Help develop and support, via site visits, training courses, and information exchange, hatcheries and grow-out farms of aquatic species of plants and animals other than giant clams. These include the culture of sponges, pearl oysters, trochus, aquarium species, and bait fish
  4. Conduct training courses in culture techniques and general biology of aquaculture species and on other topics as requested.
  5. Assist in reef reseeding programs and surveys for giant clams, sponges, and other species as requested by local authorities.
  6. Continue to act as the scientific and aquaculture advisor to the FSM National Aquaculture Center in Kosrae.
  7. Assist clam hatcheries and grow-out farms in the development of marketing and education materials for giant clam products.
  8. Initiate and develop a manual and video demonstrating various marketable uses of giant clam shells. 

 

Location Funding Institution Principal Investigator(s)
Federated States of Micronesia $70,000 College of Micronesia S. Lindsay
  1. Provide aquaculture extension and training support to private commercial operators and to local government fishery and aquaculture staff to develop commercial and subsistence crops with the U.S.-Affiliated Pacific Islands (Federated States of Micronesia, Republic of Belau, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, Republic of the Marshall Islands and American Samoa).
  2. Assist in the development of giant clam culture. This will include site visits to giant clam hatcheries and ocean-nursery growout farms within this region.
  3. Help develop and support – via site visits, training courses, information exchange to hatcheries and growout farms – development of aquaculture of aquatic plant and animal species, including sponges, pearl oysters, trochus, aquarium species and bait fish.
  4. Conduct training courses in culture techniques of giant clams and other relevant aquaculture species.
  5. Assist clam hatcheries and growout farms in the development of marketing and education materials for giant clam products.
  6. Assist in reef reseeding programs and marine resource surveys as requested by state or country authorities.

 

Location Funding Institution Principal Investigator(s)
Federated States of Micronesia $75,000 College of Micronesia S. Lindsay
  1. Provide aquaculture extension and training support to private, commercial aquaculture operators and to local government fishery and aquaculture staff to develop commercial and subsistence aquaculture crops within the US Affiliated Pacific Islands comprising American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, the Federated States of Micronesia, the Republic of Belau and the Republic of the Marshall Islands.
  2. Assist in the development of giant clam culture, including assisting giant clam hatcheries and ocean-nursery growout farms in Belau, Kosrae, FSM, the Marshall Islands and American Samoa.
  3. Help develop and support via site visits, training courses, educational aids and information exchange hatcheries and growout farms of aquatic species of plants and animals other than giant clams to promote greater production yields and economic and social goals.
  4. Conduct training courses in culture techniques of giant clams and other relevant aquaculture species.
  5. Assist and promote the development of giant clams for sale, both for domestic and international markets for each of the facilities within the region.

 

Location Funding Institution Principal Investigator(s)
Federated States of Micronesia $85,000 College of Micronesia S. Ellis
  1. Provide extension support to commercial producers, government fisheries and aquaculture staff, and others to develop aquaculture within the US Affiliated Pacific Islands (Federated States of Micronesia, the Republic of the Marshall Islands, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, American Samoa and the Republic of Belau).
  2. Conduct training courses on the culture techniques for giant clams, sponges, black pearl oysters, soft corals and other aquarium species. Training courses will be tailored to meet the needs of the facility or location and will include handout materials on the information covered.
  3. Develop extension fact sheets, manuals and videos to educate existing and potential aquaculture producers in the region.
  4. Provide general aquaculture information sessions and workshops on the basic aspects of aquaculture and potential culture species.
  5. Identify suitable local residents in the various island entities to be trained in an aquaculture intern program.
  6. Provide and identify aquaculture information resources for producers and government representatives throughout the region upon request.

 

Location Funding Institution Principal Investigator(s)
Federated States of Micronesia $85,000 College of Micronesia S. Ellis
  1. Extension support and technical assistance.
  2. Institution strengthening and capacity building.
  3. Public outreach.
  4. Information collection and dissemination.

 

Location Funding Institution Principal Investigator(s)
Federated States of Micronesia $75,000 College of Micronesia S. Ellis
  1. Extension support and technical assistance.
  2. Institution strengthening and capacity building.
  3. Technology transfer.
  4. Information collection and dissemination.

 

Location Funding Institution Principal Investigator(s)
Federated States of Micronesia $100,520 College of Micronesia S. Ellis
  1. Extension support and technical assistance.
  2. Institution strengthening and capacity building.
  3. Technology transfer.
  4. Information collection and dissemination.
  5. Applied research.

 

Location Funding Institution Principal Investigator(s)
Federated States of Micronesia $114,300 College of Micronesia S. Ellis, D. Croft, G. Muckenhaupt
  • Objective 1. Extension support and technical assistance.
  • Objective 1a. Develop and demonstrate pearl oyster hatchery and nursery technology in Pohnpei. Simon Ellis is co-PI on another CTSA funded project titled “Black Pearl Culture in the Pacific – Year 1”.
  • Objective 1b. Train and provide extension support for newly hired Land Grant extension agents.
  • Objective 1c. Continue to provide training, technology transfer and extension services to existing and newly established aquaculture projects.
  • Objective 1d. Continue to provide extension services in sponge farming to local farmers in Pohnpei. Current farms will be expanded and new farms established.
  • Objective 1e. Expansion and long-term maintenance of dedicated nursery farms at MERIP in order to stabilize broodstock supply for farmers and to reduce pressure on wild stocks.
  • Objective 2. Regional coordination and project administration.
  • Objective 2a. Improve aquaculture coordination and information dissemination on a regional basis through the publication of a quarterly newsletter that will be disseminated via email and postal services.
  • Objective 2b. Coordination and administration of active CTSA projects in the region. This years project includes various internal (sponge and CNMI permitting work) and external (pearl work) CTSA funded components that will require constant communication with personnel involved and administration duties such as ensuring co-PI compliance with reporting and technical assistance with the work.
  • Objective 3. Technology transfer
  • Objective 3a. Transfer wool sponge farming technology more effectively by shooting the footage for, and assembling a video on the subject.
  • Objective 3b. Determine and document, permitting regulations related to aquaculture development in the CNMI. Publish a CTSA Aquafarmer information sheet detailing permitting requirements and procedures for the CNMI.
  • Objective 4. Information collection and dissemination
  • Objective 4a. Continue to disseminate information on all aquaculture topics to the entire region. Rapid dissemination of relevant information on regionally appropriate culture species is an extremely important function of this program.

 

Location Funding Institution Principal Investigator(s)
American Samoa $70,000 College of the Marshall Islands R. Dybdahl

Assist the development of an economically sustainable aquaculture industry in the U.S.-affiliated Pacific islands.

  1. Establish and implement protocols for spawning and rearing sufficient number of pearl oyster spat per year for research, extension, demonstration and evaluation.
  2. Provide training to local people (Marshallese and other Micronesians) on all aspects of the pearl industry from spat production to establishment of farms.
  3. Design and conduct practical research on hatchery production of spat and farm growout technologies in collaboration with other scientists from local and regional institutions.
  4. Assist and advise in hatchery designs and construction.
  5. Initiate and maintain algal cultures. Supervise and train at least five local hatchery staff to be able to independently perform all required activities.
  6. Perform other related duties as may be needed and appropriate as may be determined by the Center for Tropical and Subtropical Aquaculture or College of the Marshall Islands.

 

Final Report
Location Funding Institution Principal Investigator(s)
Hawaii $46,350 Oceanic Institute Cheng-Sheng Lee, Ph.D.

Project Objectives:

1. Inform industry members, researchers, educators, and other key individuals of pertinent aquaculture information, and update them on the status of regional aquaculture through various media.
2. Inform the aquaculture community and interested parties of the progress of CTSA and other Regional Aquaculture Center (RAC) projects in relation to our mission through the dissemination of our own and other publications.
3.  Conduct literature search services for the regional aquaculture community.

Location Funding Institution Principal Investigator(s)
Hawaii $46,350 Oceanic Institute Meredith Brooks and Cheng-Sheng Lee, Ph.D.

1. Inform industry members, researchers, educators, and other key individuals of pertinent aquaculture information, and update them on the status of regional aquaculture through various media.
2. Inform the aquaculture community and interested parties of the progress of CTSA and other Regional Aquaculture Center (RAC) projects in relation to our mission through the dissemination of our own and other publications.
3. Conduct literature search services for the regional aquaculture community.

Location Funding Institution Principal Investigator(s)
Hawaii $68,250 Oceanic Institute Meredith Brooks
  1. Inform industry members, researchers, educators, and other key individuals of pertinent aquaculture information, and update them on the status of regional aquaculture through various media.
  2. Inform the aquaculture community and interested parties of the progress of CTSA and other Regional Aquaculture Center (RAC) projects in relation to our mission through the dissemination of our own and other publications.
  3. Conduct literature search services for the regional aquaculture community.
Location Funding Institution Principal Investigator(s)
Hawaii $46,270 Oceanic Institute Cheng-Sheng Lee, Ph.D.

Overall Project Goal

The overall goal of this project is to promote the dissemination of relevant aquaculture information within the Pacific aquaculture community.

Objectives

1. Inform industry members, researchers, educators, and other key individuals of pertinent aquaculture information, and update them on the status of regional aquaculture through
various media.
2. Inform the aquaculture community and interested parties of the progress of CTSA and other Regional Aquaculture Center (RAC) projects in relation to our mission through the dissemination of our own and other publications.
3. Conduct literature search services for the regional aquaculture community.

Location Funding Institution Principal Investigator(s)
Hawaii $58,481 Oceanic Institute of HPU Cheng-Sheng Lee, Maria Haws

Overall Project Goal
The overall goal of this project is to promote the dissemination of relevant aquaculture information within the Pacific aquaculture community. 

Objectives
1. Inform industry members, researchers, educators, and other key individuals of pertinent aquaculture information, and update them on the status of regional aquaculture through various media.
2. Inform the aquaculture community and interested parties of the progress of CTSA and other Regional Aquaculture Center (RAC) projects in relation to our mission through the dissemination of our own and other publications.
3. Conduct literature search services for the regional aquaculture community.

Location Funding Institution Principal Investigator(s)
Hawaii $58,481 Oceanic Institute of HPU Cheng-Sheng Lee, Ph.D. and Maria Haws, Ph.D.

Overall Goal
The overall goal of this project is to promote the dissemination of relevant aquaculture information within the Pacific aquaculture community. 

Objectives
1. Inform industry members, researchers, educators, and other key individuals of pertinent aquaculture information, and update them on the status of regional aquaculture through various media.
2. Inform the aquaculture community and interested parties of the progress of CTSA and other Regional Aquaculture Center (RAC) projects in relation to our mission through the dissemination of our own and other publications.
3.  Conduct literature search services for the regional aquaculture community.

Location Funding Institution Principal Investigator(s)
Hawaii $60,348 CTSA Cheng-Sheng Lee, Ph.D. and Maria Haws, Ph.D.

Overall Goal
The overall goal of this project is to promote the dissemination of relevant aquaculture information within the Pacific aquaculture community. 

Objectives
1. Inform industry members, researchers, educators, and other key individuals of pertinent aquaculture information, and update them on the status of regional aquaculture through various media.
2. Inform the aquaculture community and interested parties of the progress of CTSA and other Regional Aquaculture Center (RAC) projects in relation to our mission through the dissemination of our own and other publications.
3.  Conduct literature search services for the regional aquaculture community.

Location Funding Institution Principal Investigator(s)
Hawaii $58,300 CTSA Cheng-Sheng Lee, PhD

Overall Goal
The overall goal of this project is to promote the dissemination of relevant aquaculture information within the Pacific aquaculture community.

Objectives
1: Inform industry members, researchers, educators, and other key individuals of pertinent aquaculture information, and update them on the status of regional aquaculture through various media.
2: Inform the aquaculture community and interested parties of the progress of CTSA and other Regional Aquaculture Center (RAC) projects in relation to our mission through the dissemination of our own and other publications.
3: Initiate and/or participate in educational and outreach activities to promote sustainable seafood consumption and understanding of seafood in the CTSA region.
4: Conduct literature search services for the regional aquaculture community.

Location Funding Institution Principal Investigator(s)
Guam $16,907 University of Guam D. Crisostomo, J. Brown, and J. Barcinas

The overall objective of this project is to promote the consumption of Asian catfish (Clarias species) on Guam to all segments of the general, non-tourist market.

  1. Educate consumers about Asian catfish in order to expand the market for the product on Guam.
  2. Conduct preliminary market research, including surveys of consumers at cooking demonstrations to learn their acceptance of catfish and to estimate the size of the potential market.
  3. Investigate partial mechanization of processing Asian catfish.

 

Location Funding Institution Principal Investigator(s)
Hawaii $3,500 Hawaii Aquaculture Development Program D. Toda

Hold preliminary meetings to devise a plan for an Aquaculture Market Assistance Program that will aid commercial producers in Hawaii in the development of new niche markets and product forms.

Location Funding Institution Principal Investigator(s)
Hawaii $30,000 Hawaii Aquaculture Development Program D. Toda
Location Funding Institution Principal Investigator(s)
Hawaii $55,000 University of Hawaii Sea Grant Extension Service and Oceanic Institute C. Tamaru and S. Moss

Feather Duster Worm

  1. Determine the appropriate feed and feeding regimen to result in captive spawning of collected broodstock.
  2. Document larval development stages and determine time to settling.
  3. Facilitate larval settlement and determine settlement preferences on different substrates.
  4. Determine growth time of settled worms to market size. Summarize results obtained into technical bulletins, newsletter articles and where appropriate manuscripts to be submitted to peer reviewed journals for publications.

Soft corals

  1. Determine the appropriate type of substrate and water motion for culturing each target species. Also, the determination of an interaction effect from the two variables.
  2. Document baseline growth rates for each of the target species.
  3. Determine other critical variables that may contribute to optimal growth. This determination will be based on observations and experiences during the course of the first year.
  4. Determine preliminary marketability and crude economic feasibility information for the target species.
  5. Develop, in theory, a larger scale prototype system that would incorporate the optimal conditions and growth information obtained during year 1 also including any marketing information.

 

Final Report
Location Funding Institution Principal Investigator(s)
Hawaii $35,000 University of Hawaii Sea Grant Extension Service and Oceanic Institute C. Tamaru and D. Ziemann

Develop and transfer culture techniques for Hawaiian marine invertebrates to promote economic opportunities without dependence on wild caught specimens.

  1. Determine the feeding requirements for broodstock maturation.
  2. Determine methods for the artificial spawning of feather duster worms.
  3. Validate grow-out phase in natural and artificial systems.
  4. Determine estimated costs for the settled feather dusters to attain market size.
  5. Summarize and disseminate information obtained in journal articles, newsletter articles and workshops.

 

Final Report
Location Funding Institution Principal Investigator(s)
Hawaii $35,000 University of Hawaii Sea Grant College Program C. Tamaru
  1. Validation of captive maturation and spawning at pilot scale.
  2. Determination of settlement substrate for mass culture of feather-duster worms
  3. Field testing growout techniques of hatchery-produced feather-duster seed
  4. Production of a “How To” manual on the artificial propagation of feather-duster worms.
  5. Technology transfer in the form of journal articles, newsletter articles, and workshops.

 

Final Report
Location Funding Institution Principal Investigator(s)
Hawaii $117,735 Oceanic Institute, University of Hawaii Sea Grant Extension Service, and Guam Aquaculture Development and Training Center A. Ostrowski, C. Tamaru, and D. Harris

A. The Oceanic Institute

  1. Establish broodstock populations of yellow tang (Zebrasoma flavescens) and flame angelfish (Centropyge loriculus), or other angelfish for project use.
  2. Compare various live food organisms as first-feeds for larvae.
  3. Conduct semi-intensive, “brown” water mesocosm trials and determine live food preferences of larvae.

B. The University of Hawaii and UH Sea Grant - Finfish

  1. Compare rotifer and semi-intensive, “green” water mesocosm systems for culture of larvae.
  2. Identify other fish species adaptable to “green” water systems.
  3. Perform mass culture trials with identified species using, initially, a “green water” mesocosm, with transition onto nutritionally-enhanced rotifers.

C. The Guam Aquaculture Development and Training Center

  1. Establish broodstock populations of Clown coris (Coris gaimard) or other wrasse.
  2. Develop methods for wild zooplankton collection.
  3. Conduct larval rearing trials if larvae and zooplankton are available.

D. The University of Hawaii and UH Sea Grant – Invertebrates

  1. Establish broodstock colonies of feather-duster worms (Sabellastarte sanctijosephi) and trocophore collection techniques) at chosen farm facilities.
  2. Develop methods to settle and culture metamorphosed worms.
  3. Describe growth rates and stages of development.

 

Location Funding Institution Principal Investigator(s)
Hawaii $104,135 Oceanic Institute and Waikiki Aquarium A. Ostrowski and B. Carlson

The Oceanic Institute

  • Objective 1. Maintain centralized broodstock populations of yellow tang (Zebrasoma flavescens) and flame angelfish (Centropyge loriculus).
  • Objective 2. Examine natural spawning of yellow tang. Determine the usefulness of hormones to induce spawning.
  • Objective 3. Expand existing flame angelfish populations, and determine appropriate husbandry conditions for optimum natural spawning.
  • Objective 4. Compare various live food organisms as first-feeds for angelfish, yellow tang, and/or other identified larvae.
  • Objective 5. Determine the usefulness of treated water in culture of ornamental larvae, and examine interactions of microbial populations on overall growth and survival of larvae.

The Waikiki Aquarium

  • Objective 1. Collect and identify wild zooplankton species from in-shore waters in South Oahu.
  • Objective 2. Determine uptake rate, survival and growth of flame angelfish larvae, and/or other available species fed wild zooplankton.

 

Location Funding Institution Principal Investigator(s)
Hawaii $102,325 Oceanic Institute and Waikiki Aquarium R. Shields and C. Hunter

Overall Project Goal:

Develop and transfer innovative culture technologies for high value ornamental fish and invertebrate species.

Oceanic Institute

  1. Maintain and expand centralized broodstock populations of yellow tang (Zebrasoma flavescens) and flame angelfish (Centropyge loriculus).
  2. Evaluate the effects of harem size on reproductive activity and spawning performance of angelfish broodstock.
  3. Determine appropriate stocking densities and sex ratio for yellow tang broodstock.
  4. Test pilot scale rearing system for mass production of angelfish fry.

Waikiki Aquarium

Determine uptake rate, survival and growth of angelfish and yellow tang larvae, and/or other available species fed wild zooplankton collected from in-shore waters in South Oahu.

Progress Report
Location Funding Institution Principal Investigator(s)
Hawaii $100,000 Oceanic Institute, University of Hawaii at Manoa Warren Dominy, Ph.D.
    Year 1
  1. Collect wild giant opihi and establish a broodstock holding facility.
  2. Develop an artificial feed for opihi starting with natural diets and including artificial feeds made for other benthic grazers. The purposes are to maintain the animals and to identify possibly important feed characteristics.
  3. Identify the best method of spawning opihi and develop larval rearing methods to increase survivorship. Current data suggest high mortality during larval settlement and metamorphosis.
  4. Year 2
  5. Continue testing feeds with adjusted nutritional profiles, with different attractant ingredients, and different methods of presentation. Begin identification of optimal nutrient and attractant levels by systematically varying each individually.
  6. Rate the flavor of cultured opihi with a panel of experienced opihi eaters. Besides taste, aquacultured opihi will be tested for texture and/or mouth feel.
  7. Work on sustaining the life cycle in culture. Focus on improving management practices. On-land growout systems will have to be recirculating.
  8. Transfer technology to motivated stakeholders via extensive, hands on extension and an industry manual summarizing the developed techniques for opihi aquaculture.

 

Location Funding Institution Principal Investigator(s)
Hawaii $50,000 Oceanic Institute Zhi Yong Ju, Ph.D.

Overall Project Goal

The overall objective is to develop technology of producing opihi juveniles for aquaculture.

Objectives

Year 3
1. Collect wild, yellowfoot opihi and determine their nutritional profiles and gonadal somatic index (GSI).
2. Induced maturation and spawning through dietary manipulation and hormone injection gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH).
3. Develop laboratory protocol for opihi larvae rearing.

Year 4:
4. Initiate trials for off season spawning.
5. Quality comparison between aquaculture opihi and wild caught opihi.
6. Transfer technology to industries or stakeholders.

Location Funding Institution Principal Investigator(s)
Hawaii $60,412 Oceanic Institute Dustin Moss
  1. Collect polychaetes from local near-shore habitats and screen for the incidence of shrimp viruses previously reported in Hawaii.
  2. Culture locally collected polychaetes selected based on large size and/or high reproductive output and palatability to shrimp.
  3. Culture locally collected polychaetes selected based on large size and/or high reproductive output and palatability to shrimp.
  4. Achieve settlement and metamorphosis of polychaete larvae and growth of juvenile.
  5. Select a single species for scale-up and optimization.
  6. Biochemical analysis of cultured worms to determine nutrient composition and fatty acid profiles.
  7. Disseminate the results of the research project.
Location Funding Institution Principal Investigator(s)
Hawaii $28,800 Oceanic Institute of HPU Gary Karr

Overall Goal
The overall goal of this proposed two year program is to inspire students to consider a career in aquaculture or related field and provide them with information about how educational choices can help them fulfill those career aspirations.

Objectives
Year 1:
1. Develop the curriculum and activities for a three-day aquaculture workshop for at OI for WHS MSLC students providing up to date information on the latest aquaculture techniques and tools as well as introduce emerging technologies and college career opportunities at local higher education schools and programs. Additionally, provide students an opportunity to meet industry professionals and learn about their careers and how they got to where they are now.
2. Conduct three-day aquaculture workshop at OI for up to 45 WHS MSLC students and teachers.
3. Evaluate effectiveness of the three-day aquaculture workshop at OI and publicize workshop.

Year 2:
1. Based on the evaluations from Year One and feedback from presenters, develop the curriculum and activities for a three-day aquaculture workshop for at OI for WHS MSLC and other high school students providing up to date information on the latest aquaculture techniques and tools as well as introduce emerging technologies and college career opportunities at local higher education schools and programs. Additionally, provide students an opportunity to meet industry professionals and learn about their careers and how they got to where they are now.
2. Conduct three-day aquaculture workshop at OI for up to 45 WHS MSLC students and teachers and students from other schools with a similar background in aquaculture.
3. Evaluate effectiveness of the three-day aquaculture workshop at OI for future occurrence and publicize workshop.

Location Funding Institution Principal Investigator(s)
American Samoa $51,729 University of Hawaii at Manoa Kent Kobayashi, Ph.D., Harry Ako, Ph.D.
  1. Assist and transfer technology to commercial aquaponics farmers or potential aquaponics farmers and backyarders engaging in food security. As time permits, hobbyists will also be accommodated. The measurable will be numbers of farms or families successfully, photos of their operations, estimates of their production, and letters of thanks for assistance.
  2. Train Pacific Island extension specialist in aquaponics. After training, consult with him in whatever ways possible to help him transfer technology to the Pacific Islands. The measurable accomplishments will be the same as the operations started in Hawaii and American Samoa.
  3. Write a user friendly review of the aquaponics literature, both peer reviewed and the gray literature. As time permits, write a how to on the web.

 

Location Funding Institution Principal Investigator(s)
Hawaii $35,000 University of Hawaii Sea Grant College Program C. Tamaru
  1. Determine the most cost-effective substrate for settlement.
  2.  
  3. Determine whether supplemental feeding results in maturation of captive broodstock.
  4.  
  5. Field test growout techniques in collaboration with private sector partners.
  6.  
  7. Conduct technology transfer in the form of a workshop, factsheet, newsletter article, and peer-reviewed journal manuscript.


 

Location Funding Institution Principal Investigator(s)
Hawaii $58,275 University of Hawaii, Manoa PingSun Leung, Ph.D.
  1. Evaluation of production cost and profitability of the entire aquaculture industry as well as its various subsectors in Hawaii for the census years 1997, 2002, and 2007.
  2. Assessment of the efficiency of the industry and its subsectors for the same census years as well as the productivity across time.
  3. Stratification of the aquaculture subsectors into four categories of performance for assessing their future potential opportunities.

 

Location Funding Institution Principal Investigator(s)
Hawaii $55,200 University of Hawaii, Hilo Maria Haws, Ph.D.

Overall Project Goal

The goal of this project is to develop more reliable and less expensive methods to produce triploids and tetraploids so producers do not have to rely on outside entities.

Objectives

Year 1 and 2
1. Conduct innovative research to improve production methods for triploid and tetraploid Pacific Oysters and refine and clarify published methods to suit conditions of local hatcheries.
2. Develop a pool of tetraploid specimens to be used as broodstock for Hawai`i’s hatcheries and farms. This will also support on-going efforts to selectively breed an improved oyster line(s) for Hawai`i conditions. Each farm will maintain its own tetraploid reserve which can serve as the foundation for selective breeding of lines suited for individual farms’ conditions. This will also benefit West Coast farms since Hawai`i can generate and supply broodstock more rapidly and at any time of the yea.
3. Conduct outreach to farmers, hatchery operations, students and other stakeholders. Publish clear and complete guidelines for production of triploids and tetraploids oysters allowing stakeholders access to the protocols. Although a wealth of scientific literature exists for these topics, none of it is sufficiently complete or detailed to allow others to reliably replicate the stated methods.

Location Funding Institution Principal Investigator(s)
Hawaii $150,000 University of Hawaii at Manoa P.Y. Yang
  1. Development of a controlled engineering process at lab scale for the biotransformation of island agricultural fruit processing waste into useful, high-protein content.
  2. Evaluation of the effects of processed product as a feed ingredient on growth and survival of shrimp.
  3. Assessment of cost-effectiveness of using processed product as aquatic feed ingredient.

 

Progress Report
Location Funding Institution Principal Investigator(s)
Palau $73,524 Palau Community College, Oceanic Institute Miguel De Los Santos
  1. To develop a simple broodstock management technique for rabbitfish, S.lineatus, and produce consistent supply of eggs by spontaneous natural spawning.
  2. To develop and establish an efficient larval rearing protocol for rabbitfish, S. lineatus.
  3. WTo investigate the nursery and grow-out performance of rabbitfish, S. lineatus, fed with available commercial feeds based on growth rate, survival and feed conversion rate and demonstrate the economic viability of growing rabbitfish in tanks, ponds and cages.
  4. To transfer simple and appropriate seed production and grow-out technology to fish growers in Palau who may want to culture the rabbitfish.
Location Funding Institution Principal Investigator(s)
Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands $56,256 University of Guam Hui Gong, Ph.D.
  1. Contract with local fishers for a minimum of 20 live, adult or near adult Plectropomus leopardus and 20 live adult P. laevis caught from the local wild population.
  2. Test the resulting captive stocks of these two species for the two most common classes of grouper viruses: viral encephalopathy and retinopathy also known as Viral nervous necrosis (VER/VNN), and a group of four iridoviral diseases.
  3. Maintain these stocks in quarantine and monitor them for any other diseases for a six month period.

 

Location Funding Institution Principal Investigator(s)
American Samoa $17,300 American Samoa Department of Marine and Wildlife Resources B. Ponwith, L.A.J. Bell, and P. Gaisoa
  1. Obtain training in the techniques of spawning and culture of giant clams for appropriate DMWR personnel.
  2.  
  3. Investigate domestic market potential for giant clams produced in American Samoa.
  4.  
  5. Establish a demonstration giant clam culture station to be used for training, extension, and economic feasibility studies.
  6.  
  7. Determine the optimum sites, species, and conditions for giant clam culture in American Samoa.
  8.  
  9. Produce giant clam seed for sale to private sector individuals that have access to suitable sites for giant clam nurseries.
  10.  
  11. Obtain and compile current information on the economic viability of giant clam mariculture in American Samoa.


 

Location Funding Institution Principal Investigator(s)
American Samoa $15,000 American Samoa Department of Marine and Wildlife Resources L.A.J. Bell and H. Sesepasara
Location Funding Institution Principal Investigator(s)
American Samoa $20,000 American Samoa Department of Marine and Wildlife Resources L.A.J. Bell, P. Gaisoa, and B. Ponwith
  1. Maximize giant clam production from the hatchery to provide sufficient numbers of juveniles for extensive lagoon mariculture operations, with the view of providing background and extension training to potential operators.
  2. Conduct and evaluate giant clam lagoon mariculture operations on different reef sites on the islands in conjunction with training potential farmers.
  3. Assess, on a small scale, the viability of the “hanging technique” for giant clam lagoon ranching.
  4. Establish an additional giant clam nursery for DMWR broodstock and seed clams.

 

Location Funding Institution Principal Investigator(s)
American Samoa $29,000 American Samoa Department of Marine and Wildlife Resources L.A.J. Bell, P. Gaisoa, and D. Gebauer
  1. Operate a demonstration station for giant clam culture to be used for training, extension, and economic feasibility studies.
  2. Collect and analyze current information on the economic viability of giant clam mariculture in American Samoa.
Location Funding Institution Principal Investigator(s)
Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands $29,000 American Samoa Department of Marine and Wildlife Resources H. Sesepasara, B. Ponwith, L. Bell, R. Tulafono, P. Gaisoa, D. Gebauer, and J. McConnaughey

The overall goal of this project is to establish a giant clam demonstration station to be used for training, extension, and economic feasibility studies.

  1. Produce giant clam juveniles for distribution to local farmers.
  2. Develop and establish participation of the private sector in giant clam farming on the intertidal and near intertidal zones.
  3. Investigate and develop local markets in American Samoa for giant clams.
  4. Conduct a business feasibility study of giant clam hatchery and lagoon farming in American Samoa.
  5. Develop an aquaculture education and training extension program that will target farmers, villages, and government leaders and complement existing Department of Marine and Wildlife Resources education programs.

 

 

Location Funding Institution Principal Investigator(s)
Hawaii $99,880 Oceanic Institute of HPU Fabio Soller, Ph.D and Zhi Yong Ju, Ph.D.

Overall Project Goal
The overall goal of this project is to develop cost-effective feed formulations using locally sourced ingredients with varying physical characteristics (i.e. sinking or floating pellets), and to evaluate these feeds in a carnivorous fish (‘moi’ - Polydactylus sexfilis) and an omnivorous fish (‘Nile tilapia’ - Oreochromis niloticus). For the omnivorous fish (Nile tilapia) the diets’ formulation assessed will be based on local feed developed from previous CTSA-funded research.

Objectives
1. Conduct biochemical analyses of local ingredients to assist in feed formulation and to update the local feed ingredient database
2. Develop two (2) cost-effective feed formulations for a carnivorous marine fish (e.g. moi) and two (2) formulations for an omnivorous euryhaline fish (e.g Nile tilapia) using local ingredients (Tables 1 and 2)
3. Optimize feed processing conditions to produce floating and sinking feed at commercial scale at OI’s Feeds Research and Pilot Production Facility;
4. Compare experimental diets to a control diet by evaluating moi in floating net cages at the University of Hawaii at Hilo’s Pacific Aquaculture & Coastal Resources Center (PACRC), and tilapia performance in tanks at American Samoa Community College (i.e. growth, survival, and product quality), all with three (3) replicates;
5. Evaluate fish performance data, feed efficiency data, and economic data from moi trials in cages in Hawaii and Nile tilapia in ponds in American Samoa;
6. Organize a workshop for local farmers and other industry stakeholders to share result.

Location Funding Institution Principal Investigator(s)
Hawaii $76,000 University of Hawai’i Hilo Karla J. McDermid

Overall Goals
Provide scientifically tested cultivation information for suitable native species to grow for commercial applications and increase the number of native species in cultivation.

Objectives
1. Focus on scaling up production of the tetrasporophyte phase of Asparagopsis taxiformis (limu kohu), guided by the success of small-scale production previously funded by CTSA. Year 1-2.
2. Identify environmental or culture inducers of tetrasporophyte production based on results from previous work. Year 2.
3. Determine the optimal conditions for culture of Caulerpa lentillifera and Codium edule. The focus will be on testing substrata for C. edule for large scale production and optimizing “gentle” tumble culture methods for Caulerpa.  Year 1 & 2.
4. Outreach in the form of two publications detailing the research results and dissemination of the results through liaising with the Limu Hui, which is comprised of cultural practitioners, habitat restoration volunteers, and fish pond managers. Year 1 & 2.

Location Funding Institution Principal Investigator(s)
Hawaii $58,300 Oceanic Institute of HPU Dustin Moss

Overall Goal
The overall goal of this project is to further the prospects of commercial M. sanguinea production for use as a shrimp maturation feed.

Objectives
1. Commercial-scale growout of M. sanguinea.
2. Comparison of shrimp broodstock performance using cultured M. sanguinea and frozen, imported worms.
3. Compare worm production (growth and survival) in multiple commercially available sediments. 
4. Comparison of “multi-cohort” and “single-cohort” production systems
5. Distribute findings to industry stakeholders

Location Funding Institution Principal Investigator(s)
Hawaii $62,075 University of Hawaii at Hilo Maria Haws, Ph.D.
  1. Asparagopsis taxiformis (limu kohu) was chosen as a model species due to its high value, high demand, and intense level of interest by aquaculturists. Experiments will be conducted to determine the environmental and culture factors required to promote optimal growth and survival of both life stages of A. taxiformis. Culture trials will be conducted testing factors such as stocking density, light, photoperiod, temperature, salinity, tank volume, water movement, flow/water exchange rates, and nutrient regimes to determine effects on growth and survival rate. Work will begin with small cultures, and will be scaled up until commercial quantities are reached.
  2. Test tumble culture of Codium edule. Although C. reediae is currently cultured in Hawai`i, C. edule is considered to have superior flavor, but has not been commercially cultured. Tumble culture is the preferred culture method as it eliminates the need for substrates, lends itself to more rapid growth, and reduces post-harvest cleaning time since there are no particles adhering to holdfasts.
  3. Once environmental and culture requirements of the two algal species have been precisely characterized, a culture system(s) will be designed and tested that is appropriate for each species.
  4. Outreach will be conducted through publishing findings in a manual for use by local aquaculture stakeholders, as well as in scientific publications. An Aquatips article will be contributed. Interested stakeholders will also be invited to visit and observe the trials at the PACRC during a workshop to be held there. Further outreach will occur through establishing similar demonstration units at MERIP (Pohnpei) and UOG (Guam) to enable these institutions to conduct similar trials with native species of macroalgae (Asparagopsis taxiformis, Codium sp., Halymenia sp. and Caulerpa sp.), and to provide training opportunities for industry, educators and students. No transfer of non-native species will take place. The graduate student involved in this work will draft and submit a thesis on the topic.

 

Location Funding Institution Principal Investigator(s)
Hawaii $73,740 Oceanic Institute S. Moss
  1. Collect and disseminate information about the culture of H. picta.
  2. Evaluate alternative diets for H. picta.
  3. Improve culture techniques for H. picta.
  4. Explore potential genetic and environmental effects on post-settlement dietary preference for H. picta.
  5. Characterize biochemical and mineral composition of prey items.
  6. Produce and evaluate a formulated, artificial diet for adult H. picta.

Progress Report
Location Funding Institution Principal Investigator(s)
Hawaii $12,000 University of Florida F. Chapman
  1. Develop transportation guidelines for sturgeon embryos (seedstock), with special emphasis placed on the importance of temperature during shipment.
  2. Establish final maturation and spawning protocols for Russian sturgeon (A. gueldenstaedti), in Hawaii including short-term storage of semen for spawning synchronization.
  3. Conduct a one-day workshop on sturgeon aquaculture practices, with dual emphasis in acquisition and shipping of sturgeon livestock and in the rearing of sturgeon for meat, caviar, and broodstock.

 

Progress Report
Location Funding Institution Principal Investigator(s)
Hawaii $162,000 University of Hawaii and Oceanic Institute E. Gordon Grau
  1. Assess the capacity to increase TH deposition into fertilized moi eggs by exposing moi broodstock to iodide through dietary and/or rearing water supplementation (Year 1).
  2. Assess the efficacy of increased TH deposition in moi eggs to improve the survival and growth of moi larvae and fry to stocking size (Year 1).
  3. Determine the efficacy of adding iodide to larval/fry rearing water to increase their survival and growth to stocking size (Years 1 and 2).
  4. Prepare reports and publications for dissemination and transfer of technology and methodologies to the public (Years 1 and 2).

 

Location Funding Institution Principal Investigator(s)
Federated States of Micronesia $91,467 College of Micronesia Masahiro Ito
  1. Conduct half-pearl seeding and produce half-pearls.
  2. Demonstrate and train half-pearl seeding techniques by COM’s Micronesian technicians to selected youths from pearl farming communities.
  3. Demonstrate half-pearl pendants and accessory making by COM staff.
  4. Conduct quality assessment of half-pearls and pearl shell-related accessories.

 

Location Funding Institution Principal Investigator(s)
Hawaii $73,424 University of Hawaii Sea Grant College Program R. Howerton
  1. Determine which Hawaiian bivalve species represent the best potential for culture. Conduct preliminary spawning, hatchery, nursery, and growout trials in a laboratory setting for three native Hawaiian species determined as having the most potential.
  2. Determine whether permits can be obtained to culture established, non-native bivalves in open waters, and, if successful, conduct growout trials with these species in fishponds.
  3. Building on preliminary efforts, conduct a study to collect economic and market data on bivalves for mainland United States, Asia, and Europe.
  4. Develop two pilot bivalve growout sites on Moloka`i for use in demonstration growth trials and as possible future commercial growout sites.
  5. Technology transfer, including publication of hatchery and growout manuals on Hawaiian bivalve culture.

 

Location Funding Institution Principal Investigator(s)
Hawaii $93,000 University of Hawai`i Hilo Maria Haws, Ph.D.

Overall Goals
Address issues related to diversification, genetic selection, biosecurity and broodstock development to support the growing Hawai`i shellfish industry.

Objectives
1. Refine existing hatchery methods for C. sikamea and produce at least two family lines to prevent inbreeding in broodstock reserves. Years 1-2.
2. Develop at least two family lines and disease-free reserves of Crassostrea virginica, using broodstock sourced from Washington State or from Hawai`i. Years 1-2.
3. Scale up production of D. sandvicencis and produce at least two family lines. Resume selective breeding efforts to achieve faster growth rates and larger size. Years 1-2.
4. Develop broodstock reserves for all three species, with pools of each distributed among three islands as a safety measure in case OsHV-1 or other disease spreads to Hawai`i. Broodstock reserves will consist of 200 to 300 specimens for each species. Year 1-2.
5. Conduct outreach through publication of fact sheets for the hatchery methods for the three species. We will also hold a stakeholder meeting to assess the new needs for the Hawai`i shellfish industry. Year 2.

Location Funding Institution Principal Investigator(s)
Hawaii $100,000 University of Hawaii at Hilo Maria Haws, Ph.D.

Overall Goals
Develop methods to guide efforts to produce improved lines of tetraploid and triploid oysters and determine whether simple carbohydrate-based microparticulate diets represent a viable means of reducing reliance on large-scale microalgae production for land-based oyster fattening and similar systems.

Objectives
1. Take steps to develop methods to guide efforts to produce improved lines of tetraploid and triploid oysters which are a mainstay of the Hawai`i and West Coast industries.
2. Determine whether simple carbohydrate-based microparticulate diets represent a viable means of reducing reliance on large-scale microalgae production for land-based oyster fattening and similar systems.
3. Conduct outreach to stakeholders in the oyster industry and related fields to enhance application of the research findings.

Location Funding Institution Principal Investigator(s)
Hawaii $156,000 Oceanic Institute, Big Island Abalone Corp. Warren Dominy, Ph.D.
    Year 1
  1. Identify pigments and analyze the nutrient content contained in Ezo shell, local seaweeds and/or algae co-products and feed ingredients used in making the abalone test diets.
  2. Formulate two test diets to be fed in combination with and without Pacific dulse.
  3. Conduct a feeding trial and evaluate the test diets based on growth and pigmentation of Ezo abalone shell.
  4. Year 2
  5. Reformulate abalone test diets to commercially viable feeds without feeding Pacific dulse.
  6. Evaluate the two (2) diets in a field trial based on growth performance and pigmentation of Ezo abalone shell and an economic evaluation of diets under commercial conditions.
  7. Conduct a workshop on pigments in abalone shell, seaweed, algae and feed ingredients, abalone feed formulation using local whole algae and algae defatted co-products and abalone feed manufacturing technology.
Location Funding Institution Principal Investigator(s)
Hawaii $100,000 University of Hawaii at Manoa Clyde Tamaru, Ph.D.
  1. Establish the culture of P. vietnamensis at BIAC.
  2. Technology transfer of the hatchery-based aquaculture between the Micronesians to strengthen capacity building.
  3. Determine whether Fno remains in the environment after infected fish are removed.
  4. Summarize results and disseminate information through the scientific community and in lay terms via classical extension and outreach activities (e.g., newsletter, technical handout and workshops).
Location Funding Institution Principal Investigator(s)
Palau $133,200 Palau Community College and Oceanic Institute of HPU Miguel A. Delos Santos and Zhi Yong Ju, Ph.D.

Overall Goal
Improve the hatchery and nursery culture technology for the mangrove crabs and to deliver a consistent production of 5,000 crablets per production unit (1.5 x 5m tank).

Objectives 
1. To improve the hatchery production by establishing a better combination of algal diets that is used to nourish the rotifers and Artemia during the larval rearing
2. To test the use of live feed enrichment products and feed additives in preventing the occurrence of mortality due to moulting death syndrome (MDS) in the larval rearing and nursery tanks.
3. To minimize the mortality due to cannibalism during the nursery rearing by evaluating other alternative types of shelters, stocking density, feeding and products containing serotonin and other chemical cues.
4. To provide support to the development of mangrove crab farming in Palau by obtaining comprehensive growth and survival data of mangrove crab juveniles that are provide to the farmers.
5. Demonstrate and disseminate an improved and reliable hatchery and nursery method for mangrove crabs to individuals who are interested in mangrove crab farming in Palau and other US Affiliated Islands in the Pacific Region.

Location Funding Institution Principal Investigator(s)
Hawaii $10,000 University of Hawaii Sea Grant Extension Service and Oceanic Institute R. Howerton and D. Ziemann
  1. Conduct a comprehensive literature review of best management practices currently in place and proposed best management practices for aquaculture systems and operations in the United States (e.g. trout, channel catfish, salmon).
  2. Review BMPs developed for other industries nationwide (beef, poultry, dairy, silviculture) and in Hawaii (sugar, pineapple) to determine how BMPs support and facilitate compliance with effluent discharge regulations.
  3. Evaluate documents generated through other Regional Aquaculture Centers concerning effluent discharge and best management practices for aquaculture.
  4. Examine international aquaculture best management practices and determine how these may apply to Hawaii aquaculture.
  5. Interact with USDA Farm Service Agency to outline BMP criteria for aquaculture farmers to follow, allowing them to be eligible for federal crop disaster assistance.
  6. The final result will be the development and distribution of one hundred copies of a practical manual outlining guidelines, recommendations and defining principles of Best Management Practices for Hawaiian Aquaculture. It is then anticipated that this manual can be used by Hawaii’s aquaculture farmers to comply with permit regulations and increase farm efficiency.

 

Location Funding Institution Principal Investigator(s)
Federated States of Micronesia $56,528 University of Hawaii at Hilo M. Haws

Component 1

  • Objective 1. Comparison of site-specific rates of snail predation for juvenile pearl oysters.
  • Objective 2. Reduction of fish-induced juvenile and adult mortality through development and testing of improved net panels.
  • Objective 3. Capacity building for a local women’s group in manufacturing of net panels.
  • Objective 4. Training and technology transfer.
  • Objective 5. Pearl farming economics study

Component 2

  • Objective 1. Demonstration and seed supply.
  • Objective 2. Training and technical transfer.

 

Progress Report
Location Funding Institution Principal Investigator(s)
Hawaii $300,000 Oceanic Institute C. Laidley

Year 1:

  • 1. Establish appropriate holding system/conditions for maintaining spawning stocks of yellow tang.
  • 2. Develop appropriate diet to maintain broodstock condition and produce high-quality eggs.
  • 3. Establish early larval rearing system to maximize larval hatch and early (pre-feeding) survival.

Year 2:

  • 4. Identify suitable first feed for yellow tang larvae.
  • 5. Scale up culture of identified first feed to level required for conducting replicated larviculture trials.
  • 6. Develop larviculture feeding regimen suitable for rearing yellow tang larvae through metamorphosis.

Year 3:

  • 7. Develop suitable methods to transition yellow tang into juvenile settlement phase.
  • 8. Establish suitable feeds and holding system to ensure juvenile quality suitable for marine ornamental wholesale market.
  • 9. Transfer technology to industry through workshops, conference presentations, and publication in CTSA newsletter Regional Notes.

 

Location Funding Institution Principal Investigator(s)
Hawaii $116,000 Oceanic Institute Zhi Yong Ju, Ph.D., Fabio Soller, Ph.D.

Overall Project Goal

The overall goals of this project are to develop cost-effective tilapia feeds using locally sourced ingredients, and to evaluate those feeds on a commercially relevant scale.

Objectives

1. Formulate cost-effective tilapia feeds using local ingredients using feed formulation software and update the local feed ingredient database;
2. Optimize processing conditions to produce floating tilapia feed at commercial scale at OI’s Feeds Research and Pilot Production Facility;
3. Test feed performance on tilapia growth and survival and product quality at OI’s Makapuu laboratory and at UH-Hilo’s PACRC facility;
4. Test feed performance on tilapia growth and survival and product quality at local tilapia farms on Oahu and the Big Island;
5. Evaluate the fish performance, feed efficiency and the economic benefits from tilapia trials at the commercial tilapia farms and the research labs;
6. Organize a workshop for local farmers and other industry stakeholders to share results.

Location Funding Institution Principal Investigator(s)
Hawaii $35,000 University of Hawaii Sea Grant College Program and University of Hawaii at Manoa C. Tamaru, A. Tacon, H. Ako, P.S. Leung
  1. Conduct a thorough literature review of the nutritional requirements of Clarias fuscus and other species with similar biological requirements.
  2. Based on the literature review, develop and recommend different practical feed formulations for Clarias fuscus for subsequent testing and evaluation.
  3. Conduct an experimental feeding trial to compare current commercially available feeds with the new feed formulations.
  4. Conduct a thorough analysis of the results of the feeding trial from a nutritional, production, and economic standpoint.

 

Progress Report
Location Funding Institution Principal Investigator(s)
Hawaii $195,884 University of Hawaii at Manoa J. Yang

Year 1

  1. To establish a genomic and skeletal muscle cDNA library of Pacific threadfin;
  2.  
  3. To identify at least 50 microsatellite loci and develop PCR protocols for optimal amplification of the markers;
  4.  
  5. To collect fin clip samples from the OI and AFRC broodstock populations and analyze polymorphic DNA markers in these samples.

Year 2

  1. To develop a microsatellite DNA-based method of parental assignment;
  2.  
  3. To collect fin clip samples from the wild populations (Oahu and Hawaiian Islands) and characterize their genetic diversities using established DNA microsatellite markers;
  4.  
  5. To develop DNA-based testing protocols for monitoring Pacific threadfin broodstock and wild populations.

 

Location Funding Institution Principal Investigator(s) Hawaii $55,000 University of Hawaii at Manoa A. Fast, J. Qin, and H. Ako
  1. Confirm reliability of triploid (3N) catfish production using cold shock treatment of fertilized eggs and compare with pressure shock treatments.
  2. Compare survival, growth rates, FCR and condition of normal diploid (2N) and triploid catfish produced by the two shock treatments.
  3. Compare growth rates, survival, FCR and disease resistance of Chinese catfish fed different feed formulations. Conduct feed performance trials of triploid and diploid fish at commercial farms, and in more controlled laboratory settings at the Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology (HIMB).
  4. Based on intrinsic feeding patterns observed Year One using demand feeders and data logger recordings, alter feeding patterns to coincide with those commonly used at commercial production facilities. Observe comparative growth rates, survival and FCR of fish with altered versus intrinsic feeding patterns.
  5. Using cold and /or pressure shock, attempt to produce tetraploid (4N) Chinese catfish and rear these fish to reproductive age. If successful, we could consider crossbreeding or tetraploids with diploids during Year Three to produced 100 percent triploids.

Conduct technology transfer to the aquaculture community in Hawaii through workshops, collaborative research and publications.

Location Funding Institution Principal Investigator(s)
Hawaii $199,297 Oceanic Institute Dong-Fang Deng, Ph.D.
  1. Create a database of local ingredients including levels of nutrient and nutrient digestibility (for selective ingredients) evaluated in tilapia (Year-1) and Pacific thread fin (Year 2).
  2. Develop scientifically sound feed formulations based on local ingredients for tilapia (Year 1) and Pacific threadfin (Year 2).
  3. Develop a calibration library of nutrient information for Near-infrared spectroscopy system (NIRS) as a fast and inexpensive tool to measure nutritional parameters in local ingredients or feeds.
  4. Organize workshops to provide training and research updates on local feeds production for farmers, producers or researchers in Hawaii (Year 1) and Guam (Year 2).
  5. Technology Transfer: Publish results in Regional Notes by CTSA, present findings at Aquaculture meetings and publish papers in peer reviewed journals or aquaculture magazines.

 

Location Funding Institution Principal Investigator(s)
Hawaii $96,414 Oceanic Institute Dong-Fang Deng, Ph.D.

Project Objectives:

1. Compare the physical quality and nutritional compositions of local tilapia feed processed by steam pelleting and extruding methods.
2. Determine the optimal feeding frequency for fish based on growth performance, nutritional quality and sensatory test of fish fed the test diets processed by the different methods.
3. Evaluate the production efficiency of tilapia cultured in commercial conditions.
4. Organize workshops to provide training and research findings to industry stakeholders and researchers.  Publish results in Regional Notes by CTSA, Aquaculture meetings or in peer reviewed journals or aquaculture magazines.

Location Funding Institution Principal Investigator(s)
Republic of the Marshall Islands $297,236 Rongelap Atoll Local Government Hon. James Matayoshi

Project Objectives:

Year 1
1. Feed Development: To collect and analyze local ingredients, and develop 5 rations for Moi trials.
2. Fish Trials: To test five (5) locally-sourced feed rations in Moi fish trials to establish the most optimal locally sourced feeds.
3. Outreach/Technology Transfer: To train local workforce on feeds and fish production.

Year 2
1. Feed Development: To develop 5 locally-sourced feed diets for Rabbitfish trials.
2. Fish Trials: To test five (5) locally-sourced feed rations in Rabbitfish trials to establish the most optimal locally sourced feeds.
3. Outreach/Technology Transfer: To train local workforce on feeds and fish production.
4. Commercialization: To conduct a marketing trial for Moi and feeds in the RMI and Hawaii to establish distribution and cost baseline.

Year 3
3. Outreach/Technology Transfer: To train local workforce on feeds and fish production.
4. Commercialization: To commercially distribute 9,800 lbs of Moi and Rabbitfish, and 14,700 lbs feeds in the RMI and Hawaii.

Location Funding Institution Principal Investigator(s)
Hawaii $112,000 Oceanic Institute, University of Hawaii at Manoa, and Anuenue Fisheries Research Center A. Ostrowski, J. Szyper, and M. Fujimoto
  1. Determine threadfin growout requirements.
  2. Determine milkfish growout reqirements.
  3. Provide live feed cultures and threadfin and milkfish seedstock to the commercial sector.

 

Location Funding Institution Principal Investigator(s)
Hawaii $110,000 Oceanic Institute, Hawaii Aquaculture Development Program, and University of Hawaii at Manoa A. Ostrowski, D. Toda, and P.S. Leung
  1. Maintain broodstock and provide 250,000 seedstock threadfin to participating qualified farms to prime industry development and expand production on existing farms.
  2. Provide a spreadsheet template to enable farmers to calculate economic costs of threadfin production, and identify site-specific opportunities to improve operational efficiency.
  3. Produce a promotional brochure and value-added gill tags for threadfin, and provide market-size fish to media events and distribution outlets for evaluation and exposure to expand local and export markets.
  4. Maintain broodstock and provide 100,000 seedstock milkfish to participating qualified farms to prime industry development.
  5. Conduct extensive rearing trials for production of milkfish fry to provide a low-cost alternative for seedstock production.
  6. Provide general guidelines, information, and technical advice to participating farms for growout of threadfin and milkfish, and produce a technical pamphlet on growout of threadfin for use by farmers to ensure technology transfer.

 

Location Funding Institution Principal Investigator(s)
Hawaii $109,934 Oceanic Institute and University of Hawaii at Hilo A. Ostrowski and K. Hopkins
  1. Develop a track record of threadfin growout success in Hawaii and refine growout techniques by providing a seasonal supply of seedstock and optimizing on-site growout densities.
  2. Develop more cost-effective means of milkfish production applicable to conditions in Hawaii by examining the feasibility of semi-intensive green water culture for fry production and by stocking younger fry into growout systems.
  3. Determine the effectiveness of milkfish as bait by conducting fishing trials on commercial and sport fishing vessels.
  4. Provide information and on-farm technical support in establishing and managing threadfin and milkfish nursery and growout systems.

 

Location Funding Institution Principal Investigator(s)
Hawaii $42,000 Oceanic Institute, University of Hawaii at Manoa, and Anuenue Fisheries Research Center K. Leber, C.-S. Lee, C. Brown, and M. Fujimoto

The overall goal of this project is to develop and document control over bottlenecks in threadfin (moi) seedstock production technology.

  • 1.Resolve bottlenecks in threadfin seedstock production.
  • Secure sufficient quantity of high-quality eggs from captive broodstock.
  • Develop a rearing technology with less than 1 percent mortality per day within the cannibalistic period (Day 25–50).
  • 2.Demonstrate and document threadfin fingerling and fry mass production technology.
  • Produce 10,000 fingerlings (<60 mm total length) using improved techniques in production-scale culture.
  • Detail culture capability developed in 1993.
Location Funding Institution Principal Investigator(s)
Hawaii $80,000 Oceanic Institute, University of Hawaii at Manoa, and Anuenue Fisheries Research Center K. Leber, C. Kelley, C. Brown, and M. Fujimoto
  1. Develop a moi seedstock production technology that will resolve bottlenecks in fry production and quality and reduce mortality due to cannibalism.
  2. Demonstrate and document fry production technology.

 

Location Funding Institution Principal Investigator(s)
Hawaii $70,000 Oceanic Institute and Anuenue Fisheries Research Center A. Ostrowski, C. Kelley, and M. Fujimoto
  • 1. Develop a seedstock production technology for Pacific threadfin that will resolve bottlenecks in fry production and quality:
  • to increase survival and growth rates,
  • to reduce deformities,
  • and to examine genetic diversity.

 

Location Funding Institution Principal Investigator(s)
Hawaii $74,439 University of Hawai’i at Mānoa and HDOA Jenee Odani, Ph.D., Lei Yamasaki, Ph.D., RuthEllen Klinger-Bowen

Overall Goal
To determine which diseases affect fish producers in Hawaii, determine if non-lethal methods of testing can be used for import and export purposes and investigate whether pathogens enter the state through seafood.

Objectives
1. Determine what diseases are of concern to fish and shellfish producers, state and federal government and importing countries.
2. Set up polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests for the specific pathogens at the UHM. Compare the test results of lethal and non-lethal methods. This will be based on the list of disease priorities generated in Objective 1, which may include, but is not limited to: Tilapia Lake Virus (TiLV), Koi Herpesvirus (KHV), Spring Viremia of Carp (SVC), Viral Nervous Necrosis (VNN), Grouper Iridovirus (GIV), and Francisella noatunensis subsp. orientalis (FNO) in fish and Ostreid Herpesvirus-1 (OsHV-1) in oysters.
3. Conduct surveillance of imported fish and oysters for pathogen presence. This may include, but is not limited to TiLV, KHV, SVC, VNN, GIV, FNO, and Vibrio anguillarum (VA) in fish and OsHV-1 in oysters.

Location Funding Institution Principal Investigator(s)
Federated States of Micronesia $30,380 College of Micronesia R. Croft
  1. Improve the efficiency of commercial sponge farms by determining the factors responsible for variable growth rates in cultured sponges.
  2. Maintain the existing demonstration nursery.
  3. Continue gathering biological data on the growth of commercial sponges.

 

Location Funding Institution Principal Investigator(s)
Republic of the Marshall Islands $39,746 College of Micronesia R. Croft
  1. Improve the efficiency of commercial sponge farms.
  2. Maintain the existing nursery stock.
  3. Continue gathering biological data on the growth of commercial sponges.


 

Location Funding Institution Principal Investigator(s)
Federated States of Micronesia $30,000 College of Micronesia R. Croft
  1. Improve the efficiency of commercial sponge farms the investigation of sponges with large differences in growth rates, with high growth rates and low growth rates. In addition, the project will investigate surface differences between sponges.
  2. Maintain the existing nursery stock.
  3. Continue gathering biological data on the growth of commercial sponges.

 

Location Funding Institution Principal Investigator(s)
Federated States of Micronesia $40,000 College of Micronesia R. Croft
  1. Improve the efficiency of commercial sponge farms.
  2. Maintain the existing nursery stock.
  3. Continue gathering biological data on the growth of commercial sponges.